Research

SRT Research Projects and Collaborations

 

This page provides details of research projects and collaborations supported by the SRT and its research associates. Follow the links below to access information for each of the projects:

More information on the SRT Research Associate scheme can be found here.


SRT 2nd International Conference and Research Workshop Publications

 

A number of publications have resulted from items discussed at the workshop. These are listed below with links to download or access external websites where the work is hosted.:


SRT 2nd International Conference Research Posters

 

An area was set aside at the conference for the display of posters relating to the theme "Horses, saddle and riders: applying the science". The following posters were submitted (PDF versions can be downloaded by clicking the [abstract] or [poster] links after each title):

  • Bondi, A.; Gandy, E.; Hogg, R., A preliminary investigation of the asynchrony of horse, saddle and rider interaction. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Crosby-Jones, A., The effect of McTimoney manipulation on pressure measurements beneath the saddle. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Francis, N.J., Attwood, S.and Berry, J., Is peer pressure the greatest influence on the use of safety equipment by junior riders. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Gandy, E.; Bondi, A.; Hogg, R.; Cornell, A., A software measurement tool for analysis of asymmetry in the interaction between horse, rider and saddle. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Gandy, E.A., Bondi, A., Hogg, R. and Pigott, T.M.C. A preliminary investigation of the use of inertial sensing technology for the measurement of hip rotation asymmetry in horse riders. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Keepax, S., Attwood, S.and Berry, J., A pilot study into the effect of a GPS and treeless saddle on the temperature of the horse’s back and its freedom of movement. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Nahum, M., Attwood, S.and Berry, J., A pilot investigation into the limb phasing characteristics and stride length of fully shod, partially shod and barefoot horses. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Pigott, T.M.C., A theoretical model of causal factors associated with functional asymmetry in equestrian sports. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Stancombe, L., Berry, J.and Attwood, S., A pilot study into the effects of various mounting techniques on the pressure of the horse’s back. [Abstract] [Poster]
  • Stone, C., Berry, J.and Attwood, S., Difference and relationship in length of the ‘mean’ canter stride of a horse and the intermediate strides within a two stride double fence combination. [Abstract] [Poster]

A certificate was awarded for the best research poster submitted by a student. Congratulations to Alexandra Crosby-Jones, who received this award for her poster titled “The effect of McTimoney manipulation on pressure measurements beneath the saddle”.

 

Best Student Poster

Alexandra Crosby-Jones being presented with her certificate for best


Animal Health Trust Research Project: Horse-saddle-rider interaction, the connection between saddle slip and hindlimb lameness

 

Sue Dyson (SRT Honorary Veterinary Advisor) and Line Greve (PHD student) are based at the Animal Health Trust, Newmarket. They are working on a large-scale research project in collaboration with the Royal Veterinary College. The 3-year study is investigating saddle-slip in relation to hindlimb lameness.

 

Line Greve, PhD. student at the AHT, presented a research communication of her intern study at the BEVA Congress in September 2012: ‘Saddle slip may be an indicator of the presence of hindlimb lameness’ and was awarded the Voorjaarsdagen Award for the best clinical research presentation. She will be invited to give the presentation again at the Voorjaarsdagen Congress in Amsterdam in April 2013. Click here to view the poster..

 

Publications relating to this project

 

Greve L. and Dyson S. (2012) "The horse–saddle–rider interaction". The Veterinary Journal. DOI: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2012.10.020.

Click here to view the abstract and obtain a copy of the paper.

 

Greve L. and Dyson S. (2012) "An investigation of the relationship between hindlimb lameness and saddle slip". Equine Veterinary Journal. DOI: 10.1111/evj.12029.

Click here to view the abstract and obtain a copy of the paper.


SRT Associates in the University of Sunderland Equestrian Study Group

 

SRT Research Associates in the UoS Equestrian Study Group are part of a large-scale multi-disciplinary project investigating the interaction of horses, saddles and riders. The group are working on several research papers that will be submitted for publication in academic journals.

 

Anne Bondi, Professional Doctorate student, is investigating how different saddle designs perform by focusing on the asynchrony of the movement between the horse, saddle and rider. She presented the preliminary findings at the International Society for Equitation Science Conference (ISES) in 2012 (see below).

 

Elizabeth Gandy, Computer Scientist and Senior Lecturer, is developing a new software tool for analysis of the horse, saddle and rider interaction. She gave a presentation of the development and application of the system at the 2012 ISES conference (see below).

 

Elizabeth Gandy, Anne Bondi and Tim Pigott have carried out a preliminary investigation using the Xsens MVN inertial motion capture suit (www.xsens.com) for the measurement of hip angle rotation in the assessment of asymmetry in riders. The study revealed the presence of asymmetry in hip external rotation angles for all 12 riders analysed and found the technology to be efficient and practical, with the potential to further advance the analysis of horse and rider interactions. Future work will include validation of the technology for use in rider analysis and investigation into the potential link between rider asymmetry and lower back pain/injury risk.

 

Publications relating to this project

 

Gandy E.A., Bondi A., Hogg, R, & Pigott, T.M.C. (2014). "A preliminary investigation of the use of inertial sensing technology for the measurement of hip rotation asymmetry in horse riders". Sports Technology. doi: 10.1080/19346182.2014.905949.

Click here to view the abstract and obtain a copy of the paper.


SRT Presentations at the ISES 2012 International Conference

 

Anne Bondi (SRT Director) and Elizabeth Gandy (SRT Research Coordinator and Lecturer in Computing at the University of Sunderland) presented at the 8th International Equitation Science Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, from 18th -20th July 2012. The conference theme was "Equitation Science - The Road Ahead - how equitation science has developed as a discipline and how new innovations in technology can be used to improve practice".

 

Details of the summary paper and poster are provided below:

 

Gandy E.A., Bondi A., Hogg R., Cornell A. "'A software measurement tool for analysis of asymmetry in the interaction between horse, rider and saddle".

Click here to view the conference proceedings, which include the presentation summary paper.

Click here to view a poster developed from the paper.

 

Bondi A, Gandy E.A., Hogg R. "A preliminary investigation of the asynchrony of horse, saddle and rider interaction".

Click here to view the poster.


MSc Thesis: A Comparison of the Forces Acting on the Horse’s Back under a Half-Tree and Full-Tree Race Exercise Saddle at Walk and Trot

 

Grace Maxwell, McTimoney College, Abingdon.

 

Grace Maxwell graduated with a Master of Science Degree in Animal Manipulation from McTimoney College of Chiropractic. Her research was carried out in association with McTimoney College of Chiropractic, SRT and Tekscan Inc. Her thesis obtained a distinction and won the Dorothy Waring Prize.

 

We are pleased to be able to share the findings of Grace's thesis through the SRT:

 

Abstract

 

Summary

 

The author would like to thank Anne Bondi of SRT and Josh Ingleton of Biosense Medical Ltd. and Tekscan Inc. for kindly facilitating this research and providing technical support, Marcus Foley Racing for providing the facilities and McTimoney College of Chiropractic.

 

 

 

 

http://www.facebook.com/saddleresearch.trust      Follow SaddleResearch on Twitter      View Saddle Research Trust's profile on LinkedIn